Accueil » UFR11 - Political sciences

Contact

SERVICES ADMINISTRATIFS

 

Adresse : 14 rue Cujas - 75 005 Paris

 

Responsable administrative :

 

Odile Abadie
Bureau F611 (esc. N),

01 40 46 28 04

raufr11@univ-paris1.fr

 

Scolarité Licence 3 et Master 1 :

Claudine Poirier
Bureau F611 (esc. N),

01 40 46 28 03
depscpo2@univ-paris1.fr

 

 

Scolarité Master 2 :

Marie Bouillet
Bureau F629 (esc. N),

 01 40 46 28 01

depscpo3@univ-paris1.fr

 

Scolarité Ecole doctorale - thèses :

Clarence Paul
bureau G611 (esc. K),

01 40 46 28 34

edscpo@univ-paris1.fr

 

Bibliothèque Jacques Lagroye :

Lucie Ribourg
Bureau H611 (esc. K),

01 40 46 28 00

bib.sc-po@univ-paris1.fr

 

Secrétariat de la direction de l'UFR :

Chantal Lisse
Bureau G602 (esc. N),

01 40 46 27 98

depscpo@univ-paris1.fr

UFR11 - Political sciences

French

UFR11 - Political science

General presentation

 

The Politics Department was set up in 1969, and included Maurice Duverger, Madeleine Grawitz, Léo Hamon and Marcel Merle among its founding members.

 

 

The Politics Department is the only one of its kind in the French university system to devote itself entirely to teaching and research in this discipline.

The Department works in collaboration with the law departments of the university for all first and second year students enrolled in law or politics. It also provides classes for first and second year students majoring in economics, history, philosophy, management, etc.

 

 

The Department is entirely responsible for third and fourth year degree courses in politics, for postgraduate degrees in the subject, and for doctorates.

 

 

The advantages of a background in politics are several. Politics provides a good complement to studies in other fields by helping the student to get a better grasp of the core subjects; it is studied in particular as a method of producing legal texts that govern the economic, social, cultural and international aspects of our lives.

 

 

A politics background is also useful for specific  careers (in journalism, communication, consultancy, the civil service and local government, as political advisors, etc.), since the knowledge and methods of reasoning acquired can be used directly in such fields.

 

 

Last but not least, postgraduate degrees in politics prepare researchers who work in the Graduate School of the Department.

 

 

Whatever the difficulties of making a career in 'political science', the discipline can but progress and develop, thanks to the work done by postgraduate students and qualified researchers.

 

 

English version by Rosalind Greenstein